Tag Archives: MIPS

Digging deeper into the highRISC

After 7 years mainly doing research on Transputers and the i860, I had the feeling it’s time to do some more digging into the highRISC card.
If you have read my initial post about the miroHIGHRISC (and the Tiger) you remember the undocumented 20pin socket on the card (pictured in the upper right corner):

HighRiscLeft

Let’s have another look at the “UART port” again:

The pinout (the connector is rotated 90° counter clock-wise):

GND  oo  /WR0
D0   oo  INT2
D1   oo  /RD
D2   oo  /IOSEL
D3   oo  RESET (most likely)
D4   oo  A2
D5   oo  A3
D6   oo  A4
D7   oo  A5
VCC  oo  A23

Reading a bit of the BIOS’ disassembly, I stumbled across routines to talk to an UART.  A very common (D)UART of those days was the SCN2681. If you take a look at this chips specs, they perfectly fit to the signals provided at the HIGRISCs UART-port!

Here’s its pinout with the corresponding pins marked:

 

A2-A5 are used for A0-A3 on the 2681 and the only pin not directly represented is A23 which might be used to decode. Also, it nicely reveals that CPU INT2 is used for the UART.

The LR33000 datasheet tells me that there’s an 4MB IO-area starting at 0x1E000000 reaching up to 0x1EFFFFFF- most likely the 2681 will live there… and the corresponding signal called /IOSEL is available on the UART-port (and will perfectly help as chip-select decoder). Tadaa!

So after the UART we need to get the RX/TX signals to a higher level, i.e. the +/-15V of RS232 – this is the call for our old friend MAX232.

[current bread-board experiments sadly didn’t yield into ‘instant success(tm)’… I’m missing out something – need more time to investigate]

Bootcode / BIOS

The LR330xx CPU also has an /EPSEL EPROM select signal, indicating it’s accessing an EPROM expected to start at 0x1F000000 and ends at 0x1FFFFFFF (4MB right below the IO-area).
Using this knowledge and knowing that the MIPS standard boot-vector is at 0x1FC00000, it’s easy to feed the ROM-dump I did some years ago into the disassembler with the correct start address to do his job.

We need to get an understanding of this bootcode first, so that we can get an idea of “what is where” (e.g. ISA bus, UART etc) and later upload our own code and use those addresses.
Just to stick my head a bit into the clouds, the aim is to first port a then common MIPS monitor-program called ‘PMON’ and use that to run some sort of μLinux. But that’s probably another handful of years ahead…
PMON was a good source of information, because it’s originally written by LSI, supporting all the LSI eval-boards. Lo and behold, some of them had a 2681 UART, too… located at 0xBE000000, which is extensively used in my BIOS disassembly  😉
I have a certain feeling that miro borrowed some design ideas from the LSI Pocket Rocket evaluation board (don’t Google it, it’s a mythic being – if you have documentation, mail me!).

So this is the 2681 memory-map then:

#define BASE_2681 0xbe000000
#define SRA_2681 ((1*4)+BASE_2681) // 0xbe000004 status register 
#define THRA_2681 ((3*4)+BASE_2681) // 0xbe00000C Rx/Tx holding register 
#define ACR_2681 ((4*4)+BASE_2681) // 0xbe000010 Aux contrl. register 
#define ISR_2681 ((5*4)+BASE_2681) // 0xbe000014 interrupt state register 
#define CTU_2681 ((6*4)+BASE_2681) // 0xbe000018 Counter timer upper 
#define CTL_2681 ((7*4)+BASE_2681) // 0xbe00001C counter timer lower 
#define START_2681 ((14*4)+BASE_2681) // 0xbe000038 start timer 
#define STOP_2681 ((15*4)+BASE_2681) // 0xbe00003C stoptimer

Using those addresses we should easily identify the comms routines.

Something happens at 0xBE800000 which seems not UART related. So that’s probably the reason why A23 is available on the connector. That way we can ignore access to that address by OR’ing it with /IOSEL to create a /CS.

The DOS side of things

The tool to load a MIPS executable into the HIGHRISC is called DL.EXE. Loading the test-program prints this to the console:

miroHIGHRISC download program. V 1.00
(c) miro Computer Products AG , Germany

CONFIG: I/O-register-address: 0x368 
CONFIG: DRAM - base-address : 0xD000 
CONFIG: DRAM - size : 8 MB
CONFIG: TIGER - RAM - size : 8 MB

Resetcount = 87340

Loading test.zor
text : start=0x80030000 size=0x52c0
data : start=0x800352c0 size=0x520
bss : start=0x800357e0 size=0x150
entry : 0x800301a0
TIGER comm.address : 0x3ffd00
max_used_address : 0x35930 
real_DRAM : 0x800000 
Heapsize : 0x7CA6D0

test.zor sucessfully downloaded.

This gives us valuable information. The DOS-side uses the IO port 0x368 and has a memory window of 16K from  0xD000 to D3FF.
MIPS programs are loaded to 0x80030000 and the 16K seems to be mapped to 0x003FFD00, just 128K below the 4MB boundary of the LR33k address space.

As usual – this is heavily work-in-progress. So this post will be edited while making any new progress. TBC…

miroHIGHRISC & miroTIGER

This is indeed a very rare breed – I was informed that less than a 100 of those were sold. Built in the end of 1992 as “Project Zorro” by the German company miro (bought by Pinnacle in ’97) it took the same line as all the other accelerated graphic cards in those days: Highspeed graphic -mostly TIGA- plus some speedy general purpose CPU. The SPEA cards using Intels i860 were direct competitors for example – I was also told that miro also looked into using the i860 but scrapped that attempt in an early stage in favor for the HIGHRISC.

The Miro HighRisc -or miroHIGHRISC as they wrote it back then- was a full-length 16-bit ISA card containing a MIPS CPU and a maximum of 32MB of RAM.

Technical facts:

  • 33MHz LSI LR33050 CPU which is a R3000 clone including the R3010 FPU minus MMU
  • 1k data- and 4k instruction caches on-die
  • 33 MIPS / 33 MFLOPS
  • 8-32 MB RAM plugged into up to 4 SIMM slots
  • 32 bit bus to connect the miroTIGER graphics card (100MB/s)
  • 2D: 150000 Vectors/s of 10 pixels length
  • 3D: 10000 triangles/s of 100 pixels, flat-shaded
  • 6000 triangles/s of 100 pixels, Gouraud-shaded

miro claimed that the HighRisc would deliver nearly twice the performance of an i860/33 solution with “real-world” applications (namely AutoCAD 12). That has yet to be proven but sounds reasonable given the limitations the i860 had when used as general purpose CPU.

Here’s the HighRisc in its full glory:

HighRiscTotal

Interestingly, there’s next to none information on the Web about this card. Probably due to its high cost (5700DM) and the failing TIGA standard.
Here’s a nice snippet from an interview (in German) from 1999 with the original product manager Frank Pölzl:
Q4. What was your biggest flop?
miroHIGHRISC, a 3D-graphic card with MIPS and TI-Graphic-Processor.

Another tasty detail is that according to a news-snippet from the German magazine c’t (12/99, p.22) this card was developed in cooperation with Silicon Graphics (SGI) which bought MIPS some years before. Maybe this was SGIs first and last attempt to get a foot into the PC market?
Yet another interesting fact: The LSI 33k CPU was later radiation hardened by a company called Synova Inc., rechristened as “Mongoose V” and as such traveled into space several times… even to Pluto!

Here’s the left side of the card in more detail. It contains the CPU and the BIOS (32k EPROM dump available here) lots of 74-logic ICs, GALs and some MACH PLDs.
At the top-left corner of the picture below you see the connector to the miroTIGER, a TIGA graphics card described a bit further down on this page.
Also, there’s  an undocumented 20-pin connector at the upper-right edge of the card. This might be the 16MB/s interface “to connect peripherals like laser printers or repro-devices” as mentioned in the c’t article. Thinking about it – it’s an interface to an UART. This will be a nice project to do further investigation.

The pinout (the connector is rotated 90° clock-wise):

GND  oo  /WR0
D0   oo
      INT2
D1   oo  /RD
D2   oo  /IOSEL
D3   oo  (unknown)
D4   oo  A2
D5   oo  A3
D6   oo  A4
D7   oo  A5
VCC  oo  A23

HighRiscLeft

The right side of the card is dominated by the 4 SIMM slots which, according to the manual, support up to 8MB each. Also there’s a DIP-switch for setting up the address-range etc.

HighRiscRight

Even it has nothing to do with MIPS, the accompanying graphics card miroTIGER fits in quite good here. This card was meant to run for itself or accelerated by the above described miroHIGHRISC. This is what it looks like:

TigerTotal

Following the TIGA standard it naturally features a TMS34020 graphics processor. This processor has its own RAM to do all the calculations, display-lists and fonts. Because TIGA was completely incompatible to the usual CGA/EGA/VGA standards you had to have such a card installed in parallel to see all the DOS/Windows outputs before switching into TIGA-mode. The normal setup was to have a 2nd high-res (1024×768++) monitor connected to the TIGA card then.
More advanced cards like the miroTIGER also had a VGA chip on-board, which saved you a slot and all the extra hassle. So let’s have a look at the details:

TigerLeft

This is the left side of the card. The nice golden chip is of course the TIGA processor. Next to it there’s a National Design V2000 chip – most probably an ASIC doing all the RAM handling and stuff.. accidentally I stumbled across a notion of a “National Design Volante2000” TIGA card. Smell the relation here? So my most recent assumption about this is, that’s a somewhat standard TMS340 glue-chip, licenced by National Design to other TIGA card manufacturers.

The SIMM above is 8MB of RAM for the TMS340. Depending on the PAL (labeled 2004, 2044 or 2084) on the lower edge of the card, one could use 0, 4 or 8MB of RAM.
On the upper left corner is the connector to the miroHIGHRISC card as well as an impressive row of DIP switches.

TigerRight

The right side is mainly occupied by 4MB VRAM for the TMS340 as well as the TI RAMDAC in the upper right corner.
Below is a very simple onboard VGA controller by Cirrus Logic (CL-GD5401 aka Acumos AVGA1) and next to it its puny 256k DRAM – which is the maximum a GD5401 can address by the way :-/

This is a good place to post a big thank you to Peter Huyoff – the wonderful guy who saved my life while doing the ‘research’ on this card.
As you might spot in the picture above, there’s one chip broken… a tiny 74AS74 flip-flop – try to find a single SMD AS74 these days. It’s impossible if you’re not prepared to pay $50 b/c of minimum order fees! And no, an F74 doesn’t do it, it’s still too slow. Been there, done that.

Peter provided me another working miroTIGER for free! That’s the spririt between real men! And Peter is definitely one of them!